A Travellerspoint blog

In Pursuit of Paradise Day 5: Oh, Buoy!

The Bay Islands of Honduras

26494591465_b59b635d8b.jpg

26468648096_15d14041fb.jpg

The weather on this trip had been flawless every single day, and we woke up to another perfectly sunny day.

We had vowed to take it easy on this trip, so there was to be no insane itinerary or running about. We spent the morning at the pool doing absolutely nothing.

25889673164_3f3f651c43.jpg

26468623466_49f8f0c6c3.jpg

25889649754_c70a546d71.jpg

25891630373_306f1eab59.jpg

26494422105_033e1e5e16.jpg

25889546604_43204f100c.jpg

25889503264_fa5f3edf33.jpg

After a few hours of laziness, we decided to take one of the kayaks out toward the reef. It was a short walk from Brisa along a wooden walkway through the lush foliage to the stairs to the dock. By the time we reached the top of the stairs, Fausto was already there, heading down to prepare us a kayak.

26494481705_3235b9291c.jpg

25891643893_aa776363a6.jpg

25891674153_e61e3f7cc4.jpg

The staff, I tell you. They were amazing.

He got our kayak ready and put it in the water for us. We paddled out toward the reef (Okay, Matt paddled. I flailed my paddle around in the air in an unsuccessful attempt to do anything meaningful). Our plan was to find the mooring buoys so that we could tie off and snorkel.

G0110269.jpg

Where were the buoys?

We paddled one way. No buoys.

We paddled the other way. No buoys.

We finally gave up in frustration, deciding there must not actually be any buoys and headed back to the dock.

When we arrived, Fausto was there, waiting to pull our kayak out and put it away.

I felt so spoiled.

As we were climbing out onto the dock, Matt pointed in the distance.

“What are those?” he said.

There were two very clear, white balls bobbing happily in the water.

Apparently, it just wasn’t our day to snorkel.

We were getting hungry, anyway, so we loaded into our dusty Toyota and, before we could even reach the gate, one of the attendants showed up from nowhere and had it open. He closed it behind us as we left.

We chose to visit Marble Hill Farms, just a few miles east, to have lunch at the Crow’s Nest restaurant.

We found Marble Hill Farms easily and headed down the long, beautifully landscaped drive.

25889441764_204c549248.jpg

25889427884_86ed162cbf.jpg

26401998532_94f78510fa.jpg

Marble Hill Farms is a rustic eco-lodge on Roatan’s east end. The 26 acre property has several cottages, a dive operation, and a restaurant, but the most unique feature is a large Spanish-style building that houses Tropical Island Flavors, a small producer of local sauces, jams, and jellies using the fruits and vegetables on the farm. They offer tastings and have a small shop where you can buy things like mutton pepper jelly, fresh salsa, or banana pineapple jam.

26401974072_c53981ee3f.jpg

25889375984_460e5f9b89.jpg

26494293615_86e96c353a.jpg

25889367044_69b89e5d91.jpg

26401931672_c435b1d4ec.jpg

25891401773_b34e91e425.jpg

We perused the offerings and took away a jar of spicy salsa before heading to the Crow’s Nest for lunch. The day was HOT and the restaurant truly had a breezy crow’s nest, with only one small table and two hammocks that shared an amazing view of the east coast of Roatan.

“You can eat up there, if you like,” the smiling bartender told us, motioning for us to go up.

26468276476_eec2fe023b.jpg

26428077681_5ceb2838ec.jpg

25889283914_565486f61a.jpg

26494158355_e287a02328.jpg

25889173634_791e064292.jpg

Not only was the view amazing, but we found it was the perfect place to enjoy some strong caipirinhas, a giant burger and fresh snapper, and a great hammock nap.

We literally slept the afternoon away.

I blame the caipirinhas.

26468211096_4da153c166.jpg

26428014401_208c7fbc20.jpg

25891290253_5ae44c057b.jpg

25891281353_c9d7f3cc88.jpg

25891274213_df6fe38978.jpg

25889192034_10dd8cf0fb.jpg

26401773512_9426f93256.jpg

We headed back to Brisa and sure enough, someone was there to open the gate, just like magic.

We spent the afternoon basking in the sunshine on the spacious deck at Brisa del Mar, stopping only to rub K2’s ears or pour another drink.

26468129636_0b144260fa.jpg

26221198320_2787e431e5.jpg

26494030115_bd41588ee9.jpg

26427904271_e6af21f10f.jpg

26221158320_1da6cd5a46.jpg

26494009255_5f962b43f8.jpg

25891172813_26abbee670.jpg

25891155513_ec3b5d6927.jpg

26401661032_c018dea92c.jpg

26493945755_3e0a56b7f7.jpg

26468028866_632ba9e0d1.jpg

26493935865_450f9427b6.jpg

Before the sun set completely, we wanted to head to Temporary Cal’s Cantina, the only restaurant that was actually close to Villas del Mar and that was supposed to have a stellar view. It was about a 10 minute drive west, and truly had a remarkable view.

26401606192_07ebc7dcb1.jpg

25889030424_6daa261982.jpg

26427782921_b85cd3a091.jpg

It was also CRAZY WINDY which was very good for heat, not so much for hair.

Cal’s had outstanding margaritas as well. I was instantly a fan.

26467962256_27dce820ba.jpg

26467954726_254d725177.jpg

We kept seeing a dish come out in a tall ceramic pot and it looked amazing. I asked the table next to me what it was.

“Con queso,” they said.

I scanned the menu, which was hand written in markers on a dry erase board and only saw one thing that said, “Con Queso.”

When it was time to order, I got the fish tacos, Matt ordered the fried conch, and I ordered the “Papusa Con Queso.”

It looked like this:

26221030040_0460896ba6.jpg

“Where is the little pot thing?” I whispered to Matt. He shrugged as he stuffed cheese in his mouth.

It may not have been the right thing, but man oh man, it was good.

I learned later that Papusa Con Queso is cheese stuffed flour tortillas covered in more cheese.

I was okay with my misorder.

25891046173_2d113b446d.jpg

26401549162_e37a4929a1.jpg

25891024023_f1d2112afa.jpg

We enjoyed the strong drinks, good food, and amazing breeze until it was time to head back to Brisa where, yes, the gate was being opened as we arrived.

Posted by vicki_h 06:59 Archived in Honduras Tagged beach island caribbean tropical honduras roatan utila little_cay deserted_island

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Be the first to comment on this entry.

This blog requires you to be a logged in member of Travellerspoint to place comments.

Enter your Travellerspoint login details below

( What's this? )

If you aren't a member of Travellerspoint yet, you can join for free.

Join Travellerspoint